The Tarnished Badge Remix

This is an updated version of the Tarnished Badge video that I posted earlier. This one was done at the Character Training Institute a few years ago (which you can tell by the increased amount of hair I have…!). I also talk about the relationship between Character and Achievement, a concept I explore in even more detail in the Twin Towers of Integrity video

The police badge is a symbol of the public trust. We expect the badge to be returned one day worn, but never tarnished by unethical, illegal, or immoral behavior. This badge was worn by one of my deputy sheriffs who was actually arrested for distribution of marijuana. It was returned tarnished and is no longer fit to be issued to any other law enforcement officer. “He who has been given a trust must prove himself faithful…”

Note: As soon as I figure out how to overcome some technical difficulties, I have a very nice training series called Polishing the Tarnished Badge that I hope to upload to the blog in the next few days. The video clips will be from a training session that Franklin Smith and I conducted at the National Sheriff’s Association Conference in 2008.
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6 thoughts on “The Tarnished Badge Remix

  1. Sheriff,

    I thought your name was familiar. I did some more looking around your website tonight and I remembered. I took a one day class from you in OKC at a place called “Character First”.

    I love what you are doing. Anything I can do to help, please don’t hesitate to ask.

    Travis Yates, Captain – Tulsa Police Department

    Director – Ten-Four Ministries
    http://www.tenfourministries.org

  2. Sheriff Ray –

    To this day, I carry my badge (now retired). I tell my
    friends who are starting their law enforcement career, to never lose the heart-felt sensation that goes with wearing that badge. Today, I am still proud that I wore the badge, knowing that God trusted me to do the right thing, while pursuing my purpose, to enforce laws (protect and serve)!

    Ron Lederle (Chula Vista PD, retired 2007)

  3. How can I thank you enough for pouring the spotlight on the fact that Morals Matter?

    Your quotes figure prominently in a Monarchist brochure advocating The Royal Brotherhood of Integrity. We “support legitimate authority in order to prevent abuse that grows unchecked when a leader is not subject to accountability.” My family and I have been deeply wounded by IRA attacks whose spread of terrorism and influence in America deeply trouble me. I am thankful for the Queen and for men like yourself who are made of stern enough material “to protect those that are under your care from harmful and evil influences.” May God bless and prosper you.

    Sarah More
    Onondaga County Daughters of 1812, President

  4. A little “badge” humor…

    The Power of a Badge:

    A Drug Enforcement Administration officer stops at a ranch in Texas and talks with an old rancher. He tells the rancher, “I’m here to inspect your ranch for marijuana.”

    The rancher points and says, “Okay, but don’t go in that field over there.”

    “Mister,” the DEA officer explodes, “I’ve got the authority of the federal government with me!” He produces his badge from his pocket and proudly displays it to the rancher. “See this? This badge means I’m allowed to go wherever I want — no questions asked or answers given. Have I made myself clear? You understand me, old man?”

    The rancher nods politely, apologizes, and goes about his chores.

    A short time later, the old rancher hears loud screams and sees the DEA officer running for his life chased by the rancher’s gigantic Santa Gertrudis bull.

    With every step the bull is gaining ground on the officer, and it seems likely that he’ll get gored before he reaches safety. The officer is clearly terrified.

    The rancher throws down his tools, runs to the fence and yells at the top of his lungs: “Your badge. Show him your BADGE!”

    Sheriff Ray

  5. Pingback: The Ten Virtues of a Law Officer – Introduction « Police Dynamics Media

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